In just under a week I will be showcasing my newest comic at the exhibition For Sale, which is part of the Berlin art festival  48 Stunden Neukölln. Below is a “work in progress” taster!

taster_48 stunden

My small comic Enough Already! folds out to reveal a short story that is based on an unfortunate interaction I had with a Berliner and his dog. When completely folded out, the comic takes the shape of a pictorial brainstorm – an attempt to order my thoughts on belonging and what it means to be a privileged immigrant.

For Sale is at OT Projektraum, Weichselstr. 55, 12045 Berlin.

Show opens Friday, 24th June 2016 from 7 to 11.45pm and continues on Saturday 25th June at 7 to 11.45pm.

Link to the exhibition: http://www.48-stunden-neukoelln.de/en/event/sale

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angry lady

 

…to draw more!

Welcome to my website! I am currently updating these pages, adding new and old projects. Please email me if you would like to join my mailing list: zara.morris@gmail.com.

Image above: An alternative voice in the gallery. A scene from Let Me Be Your Guide

The Mezuzah_Zara Verity Morris_photoJM Berlin_Jens ZiehePhoto: Jewish Museum Berlin // Jens Ziehe

I am pleased to announce that my comic ‘The Mezuzah’ is now available to buy from the brand new Kunstautomat at the Jewish Museum in Berlin for just 4 Euros. Hurry while stocks last!

A mezuzah is a small case that is attached to most door posts in Jewish households. Inside is a scroll of paper on which a prayer called the Shema (Hebrew: ‘Hear!’) is written. This scroll is traditionally written by men. The Shema instructs Jews to love God and to teach his words to their children and to write them on the door posts of their houses (the word Mezuzah in fact means ‘doorpost’ in Hebrew).

When I was a young child, I found a few mezuzot in a drawer in varying conditions. A few had open cases. I was surprised to discover a paper scroll lying inside one of them with Hebrew writing on it. I was excited, and thought it was like a toy Torah. As a child, one of my favourite parts of being at a service at synagogue was the heavy Torah being ‘undressed’ by two people; getting its velvet cover and decorations taken off to reveal the plain paper scroll underneath.

I decided to turn these childhood memories into a comic. For more information about the Kunstautomat see the Jewish Museum’s website (link opens in new tab).